Partnering to conserve the monarch butterfly migration

What We Do

What We Do

Since 2009, the MJV has brought together partners from across the United States in a unified effort to conserve the monarch migration. As a leader in monarch conservation, the MJV supports monarch conservation planning and implementation efforts on a broad scale by facilitating information sharing, partnership building, and carrying out identified conservation priorities.

From 2009 to present, the MJV has grown dramatically in partners. This diverse partnership ranges from government agencies, to NGOs, to academic institutions, and works together to implement science-based conservation actions. These actions are organized in an annually updated Monarch Conservation Implementation Plan, which serves as a framework to guide conservation planning for individuals, partners, or other interested stakeholders nationally. The MJV funds project contracts to carry out priority actions identified in the Implementation Plan. In addition to our formal partners, MJV regularly engages other entities or stakeholders with an interest or investment in supporting monarch conservation.

The MJV is housed physically and fiscally at the University of Minnesota.

MJV Mission

Recognizing that North American monarch (Danaus plexippus) conservation is a responsibility of Mexico, Canada and the United States, as identified in the North American Monarch Conservation Plan, this Joint Venture will work throughout the U.S. to conserve and protect monarch populations and their migratory phenomena by implementing science-based habitat conservation and restoration measures in collaboration with multiple stakeholders.
 
Our mission will be achieved by coordinating and facilitating partnerships and communications in the U.S. and North America to deliver a combination of habitat conservation, education, and research and monitoring.

MJV Vision

The vision of this Joint Venture is abundant monarch populations to sustain the monarch migratory phenomena into perpetuity, and more broadly to promote monarchs as a flagship species whose conservation will sustain habitats for pollinators and other plants and animals.